Newsletters‎ > ‎

Newsletter 75: Apr 22, 2013

CDS Weekly Newsletter
Is this email not displaying correctly?
View it in your browser.

The Center for Decision Sciences at Columbia Business School

Welcome to the Center for Decision Sciences' Weekly Newsletter. Below you can find a list of events of interest. 

We welcome constructive feedback and suggestions to improve this newsletter. You may unsubscribe from this newsletter (but remain on our mailing list for other information) by clicking here and unchecking “Receive Newsletter.”
 
Upcoming seminars of potential interest at Columbia
 
Monday, Apr 22
 
2.30-4.00, IAB (Economic Theory Workshop)
         Tayfun Sonmez
         The Demise of Walk Zones in Boston: Priorities Vs. Precedence in School Choice (with Umut Dur, Scott Duke Kominers and Parag Pathak)
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on Economic Theory Workshop:
http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/finance/seminars/economictheory
 
Tuesday, Apr 23
 
12.30-1.30, 332 Uris
         Management Division Seminar
         Belen Villalonga (NYU)
         "Family control and corporate divestitures"
iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on Management Division Seminar:
http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/management/seminars
 
12.30-1.30, 326 Uris
         Marketing Faculty Seminar
         Tulin Erdem (NYU)
         "Consumer Learning and Evolution of Consumer Brand Preferences"    
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on Marketing Faculty Seminar:
https://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/marketing/faculty/seminars
 
4.15-5.45, 1101 IAB
         Money Macro Seminar
         Martin Eichenbaum
         Unemployment and Business Cycles (with Lawrence Christiano and Mathias Trabandt)
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the Money macro seminar:
http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/finance/seminars/money
 
Wednesday, Apr 24
 
12.00-1.00, 509 Knox
         New Pathways for Social Sciences Seminar Series
         Rob Sampson (Harvard)
         Title TBA
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the New Pathways for Social Sciences Seminar Series:
http://sociology.columbia.edu/colloquium-series-new-pathways-social-sciences
 
2.10-4.00, 1101 IAB
         International Economics Workshop
         Brian Kovak (CMU)
         "Price and Quality Dispersion in an Offshoring Market: Evidence from Semiconductor Production Services"(with David M. Byrne and Ryan Michaels)
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the international economics workshop:
http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/finance/seminars/interecon
 
4.15-5.45, 1101 IAB
         Applied Microeconomics: Environment, Health, Labor and Public Finance Seminar
         Konrad Burchardi
         The Economic Impact of Social Ties
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the applied microeconomics seminars:
http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/finance/seminars/appliedmicro
 
Thursday, Apr 25
 
2.15-3.45, Uris Hall
         Finance Seminar
         Peter Kondor  
         TBA
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the Finance Seminar:
http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/finance/seminars/finance
 
4.00-5.30, Faculty House
         University Seminar on Behavioral and Cognitive Neurosience
         Steve Fleming (NYU)
         Towards a neuroscience of self knowledge:
         How do we know that we know? The neural basis of self-knowledge (also known as metacognition) is poorly understood. In particular, it is unknown why some individuals have accurate self-knowledge –     their confidence in their abilities tends to be accurate – whereas others have less precise impressions of themselves. In my talk I will describe how the application of methods from psychophysics and decision-making provides new perspectives on metacognition. Dynamic models of decision-making allow us to make detailed predictions of subjective confidence, and compare these predictions against subjects’ behaviour. Drawing on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, I will describe how representations of confidence are integral to the decision process. However, variability in metacognition across individuals also reveals a general constraint in accessing and reporting subjective confidence. Convergent evidence from structural and functional MRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) sheds light on the neural basis for this constraint on self-knowledge.
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the University Seminar on Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience:
http://universityseminars.columbia.edu/seminars/cognitive-and-behavioral-neuroscience/
 
Upcoming seminars of potential interest at NYU
 
Monday, Apr 22 
 
4.30-5.30, 19 W. 4th Street, Room 517
         Applied Microeconomics Workshop
         Manuela Angelucci (University of Michigan)
         "The effect of stress on choice under uncertainty: mechanisms and gender differences"
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the Applied Microeconomics Workshop:
http://econ.as.nyu.edu/object/econ.event.applied
 
Tuesday, Apr 23 
 
12.30-2.00, Room 771 - NYU Department of Psychology 
         6 Washington Place  New York  NY 10003
         Social Psych Brown Bags
         William Brady, Ruglie Tuskeviciute
         "See what you feel: emotion perception in romantic relationships"
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the Social Psych Brown Bags:
http://www.psych.nyu.edu/events/colloquia.html
 
Wednesday, Apr 23
 
12.30-2.00, Center for Neural Science, 4 Washington Place, Rm 815.
         Decision-Making Joint Lab Meeting         
         Hang Zhang, PhD
         "The sampling model of frequency and probability distortion"
         iCal (to add this event to your calendar)
 
For more information on the Decision-Making Joint Lab Meeting:
http://www.neuroeconomics.nyu.edu/events_joint_lab_meeting.html
        
Weblinks of the week
 
Chart of the day: More choice doesn't always lead to a better choice
 
The ins and outs of organ donation
If we automatically put people on the donor register we’d presumably see more transplants
 
Comments